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where you can find opportunity. >> everybody's looking for yield in an environment where we can't find any. rick, what are you seeing there today? >> you had a great point. everybody's looking for yields, so everybody needs to take more risk. that's the plan. the problem is, when you take more risk to get more reward, you have more risk. you know, take the word austerity and throw it out. use the word reform. one guest just said central bankers are doing all the heavy lifting. because the heavy lifting for them is easy. print, print, print, print. the real hard part is the reform the politicians need to get these economies vibrant. it's not going to be easy. that's why it looks like it's gridlock. it looks like it's fighting. in the end, it's because there isn't one easy magic wand solution. >> sure, sure. you could call it reform, michelle. you could call it austerity. you can call it cup cakes. i don't know what you want to call t but it hurts. >> the difference matters, right? here's what we found in greece. they don't want to do reforms. they don't want to break the companies in co
in the last couple of weeks that this is an environment where there is still opportunity for extremist to make trouble. i should point out that our friends on the other side of out like to imagine that if they were in charge, we would be so tough that everyone would understand where we stood and would not be able to protest against us. it is worth noting that the last time these folks were in charge during the george bush administration, there were attacks on u.s. embassies and consulates. it is important to remember that during the reagan administration, there was an attack in which killed americans. these folks let us into the most disastrous for a policy decision in a generation. it in power in iran. it killed more than 4000 americans. it left hundreds of thousands of iraqis dead or displaced. but these folks want us to hand over the keys of foreign policy back to them? the nerve of the individuals " put attention to the worst farm policy disaster and say that the understand the region better is laughable. >> you mentioned syria. there is a lot of pressure for the administration to get invo
environment, you will find this layer of chert. it's in all colors, purple, green, red, blue. it's a beautiful rock. . >> one thing i wanted to ask you, the review in the paper recently on sunday said that your book is different from all the other books about the anastazi because you brought out some of the non-flattering parts of their culture like violence. how did you conclude that they were a violent culture? . >> well, i didn't necessarily conclude they were a violent culture, i just concluded there was violence in their culture. the evidence is very clear where you find masker sites, where every place you drop a trench there are bodies, unburied bodies missing their heads, in some cases where there will be a head in one room and you can match it up to the body which is in another room 100 yards away and they didn't just end up there; somebody took the head off. and there will be places where it's all femurs, all gathered together. and places where it's obviously some kind of warfare event where people are all huddled into one spot and they have all been burned there. the record is very c
of the environment. think about the amount of paper when redrafted the accord. but today we speak of the leadership. for example, according to the oslo accord is available with everyone to pray but it is not safe. we cannot go there. it is not safe. i do not believe in another ceremony at the white house but to and until we get to the point* you have to manage the conflict i want to sum up to tell you the book is very street. they said you are making a mistake if you raise something in a book now what will happen in a few years? people will say 182 about that and what you doing? if somebody wants to lead i can protect and if they cannot i will say was wrong but we will see the public and majority of the american people understand it is not what israel is willing to pay but want to thank you for coming tonight and will be happy if you cave ready to answer the question will be happy to answer your question. thank you very much. [applause] >> don't you think the talk you give tonight encourages the extremist of the muslim world to join israel? there is a struggle between the moderates and the extremis
in their preparation. they are the first to bear the negative consequences in growth and trade and environment, as well as on the social fabric of society. as a result of unfair trade rules and conditionality is composed -- in post. - imposed. there is a need for a new, local, economic government. i say there is an urgent need for a new global economic government, centered on people and aiming at consolidating cooperation between partners and development on the basis of mutual benefit and interest. mr. president? , i have laid before you our position, a vision shared by the egyptian people. i have also attempted to briefly outline egyptian views on the main issues, the divisions of the young and children, the women and the men in egypt, on all important questions in the middle east and the rest of the world. i am sure that the united nations is capable of addressing all global and regional challenges through dialogue and joined corporations in accordance with the principles of international law. egypt will spare no effort in dealing sincerely with all the members of this organization. we will always re
're so endangered, because the fewer the resources are -- and in a desert environment, where you don't have a lot of rain, you don't have a lot of animal life, you don't have a lot to choose from, they have to spread out and travel farther and have more space. the carrying capacity on land is less, so you have less animals on more space. and that's part of the problem. i mean, part of the problem is that we're invading, and we're moving into the desert, because we think it's a great place to retire and things like that, and we're pushing them out of that space, and they have less to choose from. jarod: now, the living desert zoo, they're extremely involved in protecting, and preserving, and educating about all desert life. why is the mexican wolf such a priority for breeding, especially among the zoos in the united states? liz: because there are so few of them, and we need a lot of help from facilities that exist in the environmental conditions that they belong in to help us out and help us breed, because there aren't very many of them left. jarod: right, because ultimately, i mean,
to stimulate cargo. the cargo has to be there from the manufacturers and from the general economic environment. but next year, the car go industry might pick up a little bit. the conditions for cargo are still very bad now. but again, overall the industry of course is still more passenger than cargo. and it's been a bit of a double whammy this year because for the long call carriers operating out of asia, they're heavily exposed to markets like europe where there's been an impact. >> are we going get anymore meaningful consolidation? i don't see eus saying to america you should really allow for proper mergers between european and u.s. airlines. do you think that's ever going it to be allowed? >> there's still a lot of steps to be taken to allow that to happen. true global consolidation, a lot of countries still have policies that limit foreign investment in the airline sector. so we need to see a lot of changes in the regulatory environment to allow that to happen. in the meantime, we did see a lot of consolidation continue to happen within regions like latin america, like north america, like
and retail business are rising. and also in some lines of the industrial business. so the overall environment for the insurance industry is very good. your free float is about 20%. will you stop here for a while or will you raise money in the future? >> we'll raise money in the future, however, not for the next 24 months. we are sufficiently capitalized now after this ipo on for the next 24 months, but there will be further capital increases in the future. this is just our first step in to becoming a listed insurance company. >> all right. and just give us your view where we stand at the moment with the world economy. because it's interesting where you're looking at your operations. eurozone still in the grips of recession or low growth, weaker growth in asia. just give us your sense of how you view the world and how it transfers back into your business. >> i'm 100% sure that the euro will survive. the euro is instrumental for the future of europe. the emerging market particularly in brazil and mexico are very interesting growing markets for the future. and also the middle and eastern europea
efficiency and, with exciting, great new- product of the time. of course the environment sometimes presents you with more tail winds that had winds. altogether, the economies have become more volatile. so flexibility is the name of the game. we do believe that we are very well positions in this thing that generally the premium manufacturers have a more supportive business model to succeed in the future than the volume manufacturers. >> i should quickly add one of the big problems for the car makers as well in east china. it was a market they are relying on it. china is now slowing, which means they will have to make tough decisions in cost-cutting and job cuts. >> thank you very much. the chinese dissident artist ai weiwei has lost his final appeal in a tax evasion fight that he says as politically motivated. the artists will have to pay $2.4 million following a ruling by an appeals court. from beijing, martin patients report. >> ai weiwei said this was a case he never believed he could win. during the entire legal process, he did not see the evidence against him. after the final appeal he
/3 of the country saying we're on the wrong track, usually that's a very difficult environment for the incumbent to get elected. and for the president, voters are not convinced they wanted to go the romney's direction, but extending where we are for the next four years is not an attractive process. he's got to walk that tight rope by saying we are moving in the right direction. and also kind of give people a sense of the next four years that are going to be better in their arrives than the previous four have been. >> sometimes we look ahead and see that yes, what these candidates say is going to be important and pivotal what their body language has said. who can forget the gore-bush debate, and you have to wonder betwn these two candidates, romney and obama, who's likely to win, who's likely to be too breathy, or maybe be an easy read just by finally expressions that could potentially hurt their performance? >> first of all, debates have -- there's no subsequent record of whether debates have been significant or not. certainly in 1980, to some extent in 1992. if you have looked at the debates fr
so they have been using their cards a little more. and paying it off. that is the environment we are in. nolast but not least, may deal with paypal, so that will add to their future transactions. for today a great day. ashley: ashley:.i. talking to john mccain about the biggest headwind facing the usa today. liz: can you imagine voting for this interview. wait until you listen come back here what he had to say. not just how we get rid of tax abductions, but all of them except two. but also which industries are mature enough that we should rip the rug out from underneath them and stop giving him all kinds of tax breaks. speaking very candidly with me. i first asked about different kinds of government strategies where government works best with this, here' here is what senator mccain had to say. >> you're picking winners and losers, and obvious in the case of solyndra and many others, we have picked losers. but there are so many technologies that have been developed is gps, the internet, but that is a research and development area handed over from the private sector. that is where
vulnerable in this environment? >> that is a tough call. i generally don't talk about equities we met. david: i know that tim certainly does. i know that you have some panning ones as well. let's talk about the ones you expect to do well. why do you think that international paper is a good stock. >> they are probably seeing pricing power. contrary to the data we are seeing, we are seeing names like them, really getting prices to consumers. their exposure there, this could mean eight up to 10%, you have seen it react already, it has more upside. david: las vegas. a lot of pickers love this stuff. why do you? >> well, you are still seeing a fair amount of exposure to an operation in singapore. about 30% of the revenue. only about 20% exposure to vegas. the numbers are just terrific. gaming revenue is great, a lot of stocks that are cheap. david: tim and brian larry, thank you for sticking around a little lower than usual. we appreciate it. david: colombia used to be the last place to do business. now, it has become the second-largest economy to all of south america. the man who orchestrated th
and reinvent the rule naps is because we are in a very different work environment technology is making older jobs outdate faster and spin off new jobs. and they each one requires more education. and i just think if we're going it i think america is a huge advantage in the world. because the i think the world is going to be divided going forward between high imagination and enabling countries and low imagination enabling country. rethe highest imagination enabling country in the world. if you have spark of an idea you can go to delta in taiwan they'll design it. they'll get you a cheap chinese manufacture. amazon will gift wrap it for christmas. free lancer get the logo. they are commodities except this. that's no country that does better. the problem with this though, the days will ford will move to your job with 25,000 person factory is over. it's 2500 people and a lot of robots and you know the old joke, the modern factory of the future is two employees, a man and the dog. the man is there to feed the dog and the dog there to keep the man away from the machines. generating 12 million nor j
procurement called next generation desktop environment. so, agencies are moving in that direction, and we're seeing more and more of those come in. mostly cross-domain is a component of a bigger procurement, not a procurement on itself. >> on itself. and so you would then team with other firms and there's a lot of teaming going on around all that cross-domain. yes. and so people looking to enter this segment of the marketplace, what should they focus on? i mean, obviously, their competency. what else? >> you know, i would say partner with someone who's in the space already. we're not the only ones, of course. there are others. because it's a tough-- it's a tough area to get into if you're not experienced in it. >> ok. yes. and when you mention security clearance, is it a highly secured space? >> yes, it is. most of the solutions are installed in scifs or other secure facilities. >> mm-hmm. so, if you haven't been in this, it's not something that you can, as an ingenue, start up. >> right. it's a difficult startup. yeah. >> and you need to have those clearances. what about the depth that r
and solutions. and again with the complicated regional and international environment, we have to be very, very careful. we are drawing down of two wars in the middle east, in iraq and afghanistan than many would say at the very least in terms of success and some would characterize as failures, especially into the future. so they have to be very, very careful about interjecting our source. frankly perhaps ultimately if this uprising unworn syria basically can be contained. there needs to be a syrian solution to this. as i said earlier, many of the syrian opposition are as pro-u.s. anyone else's career. we have to be careful about these things. and i think we just can't throw our weight around. as much as we would like to. as much as there seems to be a moral imperative to do so, we don't understand the landscape. we are getting a better idea, but the opposition is so decentralized. there is no coherent group, you know, we could support that we be as i said earlier shooting in the dark to some degree. you know, what would happen in terms of the worst across borders or hezbollah. why would russia
what moody's does in this environment, where actually we're discussing whether there will be intervention on the ecb? >> first of all, i think it is very relevant because this would bring spain's rating down to junk levels, which is the lowest of all three rating agencies, so it's a pretty big deal. and then the ecb program can't be implemented until spain actually says they want help. so it depends what happens first. i think it's going to be a slippery slope. finally, we've got the budget coming up tomorrow. there are more painful cuts, it could mean more pain for spain and more pain for the euro. >> there's a lot of tifs in tha. >> you could also argue that all the central banks have been ineffective in generating momentum in the markets right now. so even if they're persistently buying, it's really about risk appetite and sentiment. i don't think there's enough there. central banks could come in and make another announcement, but i think having just made these unprecedented announcements, that that could lead to firefighting. >> what are you targeting? >> lo
thinking outside of the box. it is an environment as challenging as this one. >> take advantage of the tax breaks. >> tlur tax brehere are tax bre small business owners. auto expenses travel expenses start up costs shths professional fees legal fees. maximize all of this some you can actually control. >> thank you so much. i know people out there appreciate the tips today. >>> the time now is 25 after the top of the hour. coming up a freedom of religion fight breaking out in one town. it is all in an effort to keep prayer at town meetings. new reports showing more and more teacher's unions are ditching the democratic party to throw their support behind republicans. >>> but first on this day in history back in 1970 remember this one, vera? patti ann. the partridge family premiered on tv. >> welcome back to "fox & friends first". i am patti ann browne. >> i am heather childers. thank you for joining us. it is half past the hour. that means it is time for your 5@5:30. the top five stories making news for you at this hour. troops spoiling an insider attack against u.s. forces in afghanistan. t
mean investing in education, health care, the environment, and middle-class tax cuts and retirement security. that is my agenda and that is why i think that it's not just a question of experience. >> governor bush, one minute rebuttal. >> well, we do come from different places. i come from west texas. the governor is the chief executive officer. we know how to set agendas. i think you'll find the difference reflected in our budgets. i want to take one-half of the surplus and dedicate it to social security. one-quarter of the surplus for important projects, and i want to send one-quarter of the surplus back to the people who pay the bills. i want everybody who pays taxes to have their tax rates cut. and that stands in contrast to my worthy opponent's plan, which will increase the size of government dramatically. his plan is three times larger than president clinton's proposed plan eight years ago. it is a plan that will have 200 new programs -- expanded programs and creates 20,000 new bureaucrats. it it empowers washington. tonight you're going to hear that my passion and my vision i
the ability to cause us taxpayers to have to pay them for the right to protect our environment and our water supply and our climate and human rights and wages and things like that. so this is absolutely outrageous. if we could go back to a system of one person, one vote, and have a real free press that enabled us to communicate and inform each other this would be a wonderful idea. unfortunately we're not there right now, so political parties in my view allow us to work together around the shared agenda. and the green party is really the one political party that is not funded by corporate money, by money that's coming from special interests. so in my way it's a way -- view it's a way for us to work together on our lives, future, education, our health and environment. host: according to the latest fcc records you received a recent installment of about $160,000, part of the matching funds still in place for those candidates who agree to accept matching funds. is that a enough money to spread the green party message? guest: we have a different way of approaching this. the big parties use tv adve
done is produce an environment in which for all the numbers talking about, the victory came to just to numbers. the 40. as you said to me 180% in the 08. if he matches that and they represent at least the toyota 6% they did last time he only needs 40 percent of whites. in fact, as they were saying, the internal composition is changing in a way that makes it more accessible from to get there. you know, to me you have to look not only in education but gender and basically it creates four quadrants. if you look at el eight college white man, not college white man, and on college what women. obama was at 42 or below. he will drop in all three of those quadrants this time. numbers are consistently running a little lower than they did in l.a., and on college men and women and the college men. the fourth quarter with a college-educated white women, and he won a majority of them last time. in all polling, including ours, he is holding a majority. so basically the math that gives you at this point for the republicans is that if obama can hold his 80 percent among the minorities, which he is
, an out of touch millionaire declared war on schools, the unions, environment, fair pay. we're on our own with romney has his way. he's against safety nets. if you fall, tough luck. i strongly suggest that you wake the [bleep] up. >> all right, now look, this message is direct to a lot of folks, but specifically, they of course want to reach african-american latinos and minority groups because it made such a difference in the 2008 campaign. 2 million more black voters voted in 2008 than 2004 and 2 million more latino voters voted in 2008. it's important for them to get back out. in terms of younger voters, 18-29 year olds, enthusiasm makes a big difference. in 2008, 79% definitely planned to vote. now this career, only 63% definitely plan to vote. and so, what happens if you don't go out to vote? well, everybody remembers 2000, don't they? >> stand by, stand by, cnn right now is moving our earlier declaration of florida back to the too close to call column. >> what a night that was. and what a nightmare it wound up being for the country when that was made in the wrong way. and of course,
to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> half past the hour, i'm deb feyerick in for randi kaye. >> i'm victor blackwell. thank you for starting your day with us. chemical weapons in syria. youtube videos uploaded by an opposition group suggest rebels know where they are. cnn cannot independently confirm this video or the claims but syrian activists say it shows military installations in tunnels. we will go to more about this in just a moment. our mohammed jamjoon is in syria. >>> making a decision for themselves and their daughters. it's airing next week. it's inspired by his award winning book co-authored with his wife, cheryl. meg ryan, gabrielle union went to different corners of the globe to me
other school environment besides this? >> i don't know if he's going to survive in this one! >> lawerance, stop. don't go out that door. >> go ahead and walk. go ahead and walk. and he'll be back tomorrow. he might not be back on time, but he'll be back. because this is the best he's got. >> marcus stayed in jail two or three nights, got out. we tried to get him to come up here to school to kind of talk about what the consequences were going to be, what the next steps were, where we go from here. so he agreed to come in saturday morning, 9:00 or 10:00. i talked to him at probably 9:30 or 10:00, and i said, "okay, well, go ahead and get your hair done, and then call me when you get done." and here we are at 1:00, and i haven't heard from him. at this point he's... i'm worried that he's avoiding us. sorry, i'm trying to find marcus. are there any other hair places around here? barber shop at the end of the strip center. hi, i'm hunting down a kid. and i think he was coming here to get his hair cut. >> nada? >> nothing. it was all women. it looks like marcus ditched me. i just
, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> welcome back, everybody. we keep our eye on dueling campaign events taking place in virginia today on the right of your screen, mitt romney is now addressing veterans at an american legion post in springfield, virginia, and on the left of your screen we're awaiting president obama, who is going be to attending a grassroots event at farm bureau live, that's an amphitheater in virginia beach. both men courting the military vote today in the state of virginia. that's going to wrap things up for me. "now" is straight ahead. >> we are doing anti-rain dances to make sure you have blue skies for your big day saturday. congratulations in advance, my friend. >> no rain, no rain,
it is a constantly changing environment out there. >> this area has been fault about a dozen time this season but the vector control has not been able to locate all the mosquito breeding grounds in brentwood alicia read kron 4 news. >> anywhere to watch one of the eight most exciting events of the year. sponsored by g san francisco's fleet week activities will bring you all this out sights and sounds will bring it to you live. . kron 4 blue angels live starts on saturday at 3:00 p.m.. still aheadthe kron t getting started we will tell you why if you are thinking about going into san francisco and driving you may want top on public transportation. here is a live look at the bay bridge toll plaza is still spotty. it will be a nice day you can see the cars it will be a nice day not a problem here. and 1 mi. visibility for half moon bay 3 currently in hayward. no. they valley at about 9:00 a.m. will still be sitting of the bay and along the coastline by noontime still hugging the san mateo coastline plus the golden gate bridge and then pushing back into the overnight hours so as not point to be t
affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... ♪ ♪ we're lucky, it's not every day you find a companion as loyal as a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. >>> last night on this show we had an exclusive report on something being held up in congress you sort of can't believe would be held up in congress. i'll admit to be fired up about this on last night's show but i still find it unbelievable. here's an simple idea. an american soldier gets killed in the war. that soldier's payment gets a payment, dependency and indemnity compensation, we're sorry, your husband, father, mother or wife was killed. you'd think this would be one of the less partisan inf
environment, even 90 minutes with a skilled moderator, allow them to go at each other, steering the debate, that is one thing. but if it is complete free-for- all, i think the campaign would never risk it. >> in the first debate, i learned afterward, nixon was one of the smartest politicians ever to be vice president, and of course later, president. and he was the most gracious. that did not come across in the debate. why was that? no one seems to have asked that question. was he over-awed by his wealth, his tan? that is why what i want to know. why nixon did not bring that out as much as he did in the first one, in the next three. >> if i could, on the fact checking, one thing that i do that is helpful is to go to multiple fact checking organizations. go to several and get the consensus about what people have to say about the candidate's statements. >> we will go to a question from the studio. >> i have a question for professor mcilwain. i have been intrigued by your academic work, looking at how race influences the way candidates communicate with different audiences. for the first time,
in a very changing and the fluid environment. an interesting question of personal style. host: is it something state department officials advise a president on? this is what you need to do when you are talking to an arab leader, this is what you should not do, etc.? guest: very much so. i think the foreign service officer corps -- which i was not a foreign service officer -- is really inculcated when they go out to missions to the particular country. but certainly any president should be well briefed, and would be expected to be well briefed about particular customs that are certainly anathema but also those which are icebreakers that can really help make a difference. host: oregon. democratic caller. chalk is joining us. caller: good morning. i just wanted to make a quick comment about how offensive it is for me that other people would kill someone because they are offended from what someone else might do. i don't know if those people don't understand -- that this is a democracy we live in. all that means is wednesday of no. you they will do whatever they want to you. that is
in the environment that they're in, no matter what we do, that environment will take them and chew them up and spit them out. so he's out on the streets, doing who-knows-what. >> i been gettin' money. hustling. just getting it. >> this doesn't sound legal. >> it's not. it's not. >> we're trying to figure out if he's going to choose to drop out. it's very likely at this point. it's kind of the hardest one on me because i feel like this one should make it. he's got football, which it should be a motivation. but now i'm starting to realize that... in his case, all of that stuff may not matter. >> because people at the school, they expect so much from me and like i'm not this little just preppy school kid. i ain't never been that. and it's hard trying to become that. man, pooh! i know i have to go to school and graduate. like i know this in my heart. but like, it's just everything in my body, like my mind, like do not want to. but i know i need to. so it's like that's why i'm there sometimes, then i'd be away, then i come back, then i go back away. >> i was supposed to battle some nigga the other day,
done is produce an environment in which for all the numbers we are talking about, the obama formula victory can be produced at just to members of mabey effort on the side to the and to what 80% of the nonwhite voters in zero age, not just that in 2012 and they represent at least 26% they did last time in the 40% of whites. and in fact as we were saying, the internal composition of the white vote is changing in a way that makes it more accessible for him to get their. for me you have to look not only get education but gender and basically creates the four quadrants. if you look at 08, the college white men, non-mccaul which white men and women, obama was 42 or below. he will drop in all three of those. the numbers are consistently running a little lower than they did. the college-educated white women won a majority of them last time and in all of the polling including ours, the "washington post" she is holding that majority. so basically the map it gives you is that if obama can hold 80% among the minorities, which he holds a 70% a little one friday, if he can hold his 52% among the
. i think that's really the answer to jobs, because in a zero corporate tax rate environment if the private sector doesn't create tens of millions of jobs, i don't know what it's going to take to create tens of millions of jobs. it's the answer when it comes to exports bleeding out all existing federal tax out of all goods and services. it's the answer to china. i see manufacturing jobs flocking back to the united states given a zero corporate tax rate environment. are you hearing these things from these other two guys? no, not even remotely close. they're arguing over who's going to spend more money on medicare. romney says he wants to balance the federal budget, but that he wants to increase spending for the military. well, it doesn't add up. and if we want to believe in the things that these guys are saying, then i guess we belief in the easter bunny and santa claus and by extension the tooth fairy and, steve, i don't think thai coming. >> host: gary johnson is with us, and want to remind viewers we'll a add a fourth line this morning for third-party voters, 202-585-3883 i
friendly, welcoming environment. it's called the 26th street flea market. it works here because it's right in the center of manhattan. woman: it's really been the main flea market in the country for years and years, and now it is changing. there's so much building. i find it hard to believe that this parking lot will be here very long, but as long as it is, it will definitely be a destination. man: everybody likes something else, and new york city's international city. in the flea market, there is a lot of old stuff, and it's sold from all over the world. people come back and see if they really loved it. that's why people come back and buy it. zubrod: it's like you're taking a trip to about a hundred different countries, but all at once. you're taking a trip back through time. you're going back to the '20s. you're going back to the '60s. i feel good surrounded by old things. a lot of the stylists and designers buy from us, and they go out and mass-produce things, and you find them in the stores...eventually. but you find them here first. i'm not really looking for the bargain of the centur
going forward in order to create an environment where this can be built on a safer basis. let me turn now to the challenges facing the rest of the world. each and every part of the world has to also the liver. and i told you that emerging market economies and in low income countries, promises have been delegated upon. because in the crisis, when it hits, they were in the darkness. emerging markets were able to move the global economy in terms of needs and low income countries, because they have suffered were able to resist the crisis. but after several years of very strong growth for some of them, some of them double digits, clearly, that is shifting and illusion of decoupling, has definitely vanished. the major emerging markets are slowing. that will be reflected in our forecast as well. they must follow through on actions needed to position themselves as the potential global growth leaders for the future. the focus should be on countering vulnerabilities. what does that mean that? that means fiscal tightening on hold and even putting in place the right degree of stability, as well a
that it's an a austere environment and it's not safe. my answer to that is you do what you have to to make sure that it is safe so you can conduct your investigation. you ask your guys on the ground what is needed to secure that area and you do it immediately. to me there is no other acceptable course of action regarding it. martha: what do you think -- the more you learn about the details of that night, and that your two former colleagues were half a mile away in another location, and that this action apparently moved from the consulate where ambassador stevens was to the area half a mile away where they were and they got drawn into this. what does that tell you from your experience? >> from an operative's perspective it absolutely tells me there was a number of individuals utilized in the attack, without question, in my opinion, it was preplanned and it needs to be coordinated at a petty high level. so it's not something that is easy to pull off based on the fact that there was multiple locations, good distances apart, for sure that they had pretty reliable intelligence on what was going
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i looked at my options. then i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call now and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it helps pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. to me, relationships matter. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. [ male announcer ] with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. plus, there are no networks, and you never need a referral to see a specialist. so don't wait. call now and request this free decision guide to help you better understand
and environment reporting network found more than 100 reported illnesses due to blue-green algae exposure. >> essentially if we don't solve this problem somebody is going to die. >> reporter: ohio state's dr. jeffrey reuter is the foremost authority on blue-green algae and he says it is a nationwide problem caused by farm fertilizer runoff. the cure he says is convincing farmers to carefully fertilize so nutrients stay on the fields and not in the water. >> other wise the blooms are going to continue to grow, the human health problems that we see are going to increase. >> reporter: assaulting our senses, our economy, and our health. jim avila, abc news, wisconsin. >> that is nasty stuff. >> the wisconsin department of natural resources says the best way to treat this is naturally. but, they say that it could take several years to get rid of it come fleetl completely, a large amount of lake erie, third of the surface covered. >> cut big time into the fishing industry there. in more or less every state. peaks august through september. nearly every state in the union. clear rereally bad ther
place. they set up a set just like it will look like in denver. they are used the environment. they have somebody to play the moderator and ask questions. obama does not like sound bites. they force him to give answers. they do whatever they can to simulate the debate situation. >> you quote a former chief of staff to boast -- to vice- president alkyl and joe -- al gore and joe biden. let me read some of his points. -- can you elaborate? >> sure. he is not really specifically using this advice for romney or obama, although i have no doubt many of these tips are being passed on to president obama. it is interesting. that was my first short summary of what he has to say. he went into more debt -- depth about each one of those things. impressions of the debate are formed very early. in the first half hour. a lot of the reporters will be writing their stories in the first half hour. you need to come out strong. if there is something you want to say, you have to say it right away. you suggest candidates, when they come out to the sage, right down three points they want to make. when you are w
, the target-rich environment for the obama campaign, the former governor who's very popular in richmond and the president is popular also, and what somehow emblematic that race might be for the nation? the other thing is, given a long habit of being the party of patrilineal succession, who was in the on deck circle, keeping sports, whose in the on deck circle for republicans should governor romney lose the sight of? >> so virginia, i feel like bitching is the tipping point state this year, in that i feel if you pick one state and say whoever one is most likely to what i've always felt it was virginia. and now it might actually be -- it's not ohio because romney can win ohio and still uzbek virginia, the winner of virginia's most likely. it shows the two modern coalitions on the playing field in which the two modern coalitions are fairly arranged. it is this growing minority population, 30% in awake, including 10% in the white nor black which is an important dimension. it's not on deepening but it is broadening. is reaching place it has not previously been affected by. and then you cut t
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